French Armoire in the Study

Many of you have asked about the pretty French armoire in the study.

She’s a pretty little thing in a nice petite size. When it originally arrived, almost a year ago, I used it in the master bedroom.

But in the back of my mind, I knew that it was going to be the perfect piece to use in the study to hide my wireless printer and extra supplies.

Here’s a picture of it in the bedroom.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

Once the renovation was completed, we moved the armoire into the study and it fit perfectly, not only in the space, but also in style.

What didn’t work, however, was the color.

It was a very pretty verdigris green color, and while I liked this color, it just didn’t work in this room. So out came the paint!

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

My favorite paint for making over furniture with a frenchy European feel, is Pure & Original Classico paint.

They have such a gorgeous selection of true European colors, and for this makeover, I chose the colors Pebble Stone, Lagoon Water, Blue Stone, and Sea Salt.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

The key to getting a finished piece with an authentic antique look, is to layer complimenting colors, which will create a depth that just can’t be achieved with a one coat color.

I started with my base color of Pebble Stone. This is such a pretty gray and pairs well with the other blues in the room.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

This paint is so silky and it’s a dream to work with. I know I’ve told you this before, but it’s like silky pudding.

Sometimes I like to add a little bit of “roughness” or “thickness” in areas to replicate century old layers of paint, and it’s really easy to do with P&O paint.

It has so much body that I can dab thick layers on and it will dry without dripping, leaving lots of wonderful texture.

I didn’t have to do it with this piece however, because it already had textured areas in the original finish.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

After the base coat dried, I added highlights, using a dry brush technique, with the color Lagoon Water.

A dry bush technique is simply dipping your brush in the paint, wiping all of the excess off, and then very lightly highlighting the edges and raised areas.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

This armoire had such pretty details, that I wanted to bring those out a bit more, so I used the color Sea Salt to go over them.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

The door and side panels had gorgeous carved detail and I used Sea Salt in the recessed areas, as well as Blue Stone, which is one of my favorite blues.

It’s a wonderful gray blue.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

This paint dries very quickly so I was able to paint this all in one day.

Adding glaze or a dark wax can really make a big difference in how much depth a piece has, and it can also age a piece very nicely, giving it that century old look.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

I personally find dark wax to be difficult to work with. It’s really easy to get a project too dark, so I always antique a piece with my homemade glaze, which is simply acrylic artist’s paint in color burnt umber.

It’s water based so it’s easy to control how much or how little you add. If you get too much, just take a damp cloth and wipe it off.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com
I always dilute a small amount in a container, with just a tiny bit of water until it’s the consistency of milk. I also use a small 1” wide artist’s brush, and usually only add the glaze to the nooks, crannies, and details. Brush on, wipe back.

Use it anywhere that you want a little bit of aging.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

After the glaze dried, I finished it with clear wax.

I used P&O’s new liquid wax. I have to tell you, I am obsessed with this wax, It is so easy to use, just brush it on or rub it on with a soft cloth. Let it dry (it dries quickly), and then buff with a soft cloth. It leaves a beautiful soft sheen.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

With the Classico paints, it’s not necessary to finish with the wax, as it will dry to a soft matte finish. I just happen to love the soft sheen that a waxed finish gives.

As you can see, I didn’t paint the inside of the armoire. I rarely paint the insides or backs of pieces, unless they are going to be seen, and in this case, I will be the only one seeing it.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn Vintage | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

This pretty French armoire now fits in perfectly in the study.

French Armoire in the Study | Edith & Evelyn | www.edithandevelynvintage.com

My ugly printer and supplies can be hidden in french style!

Cheers,
Cindy

Source List (may contain affiliate links):

French Armoire: Soft Surroundings

Pure & Original Paint

 

21 thoughts on “French Armoire in the Study

  1. Cindy,you make this look so easy. I have a gate-leg drop-leaf table that I’m seriously considering using this paint. My biggest problem is the color choices.

  2. I thought I was the only one to use acrylic burnt umber to create depth and age furniture. It is so easy! I love this piece, before and after.

  3. This transformation turned out gorgeous Cindy, I like it even better then the original color it came in…lol…you did an amazing job on your petite French cabinet. It looks great in your pretty office space. Hope you have a great day.

    Smiles~
    Mari

  4. It looks amazing and I really love the new finish! It’s perfect for this space. You do a fantastic job painting and creating authentic looking aged pieces! I need to try this paint and thanks for the tip about creating your own alternative to dark wax!

  5. Beautiful new look to that armoire, Cindy! I liked it when you first got it too. Another reason for me to try P&O paint. I first looked into it when you did that wall in your kitchen last year. Lovely colors!!
    Celia

  6. I luved this armoire when you showcased it a year ago. But wow!!! You truly made it more beautiful. Glad to know I am not the only one who relies on good old burnt umber for aging. The artist in me still finds it easiest to work with. My failsafe Popping on the paint page to peek….
    Big hugs! Gee

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